Found Audio

FAbyNJC

I went on a small bookshop tour of Columbus, Ohio for my birthday this year. To my surprise, Columbus has a small independent publishing company called Two Dollar Radio. They have a cute, trendy, minimalist cafe/bookshop where you can stop by, have a coffee, grab a bite, study, or buy books. I did the latter, picking up two small, sci-fi/fantasy paperbacks. The first of which is Found Audio by N. J. Campbell.

The note under this title described it as, “Indiana Jones meets Inception.” An audio and recording expert is approached by a strange man with three cassette tapes. The man pays the expert a large sum of money to find out everything she can about the cassettes. The book takes the reader through the content of the tapes and the mysterious events surrounding them. The tapes are primarily a recording of a journalist who is recounting his strangest journalistic experiences. These experiences include a delirious treck through a swamp in the Bayou, meeting a monk in the Walled City of Kowloon in its final days, and a tent city populated by dreamers in the desert.

The “chapters” in the novel include introductory and concluding notes by the author (who supposedly found the audio and transcripts), a note by the audio expert who transcribed the tapes, and the transcript of each of the three tapes. What’s the plot? There really isn’t one. The transcripts of the tapes tell the story of the journalist and his adventures, but what’s the point? Surreal scenes as well as symbolic imagery and thought-provoking ideas leave a lot up to interpretation. The point of the novel is not so much the actual narrative recorded on the tapes but more about the journey of self-discovery that the journalist goes through. The novel is very intelligent and dives into the ideas behind consciousness, dreaming and dreams, fulfillment, and life itself. The characters are somewhere between completely missing to underdeveloped to mysterious. We get glimpses of many characters, but the journalist is our main point of contact as he narrates. His first-person narration lets us get inside his head, but anything beyond his direct experiences often remains a mystery.

If you’re looking for a cohesive plot with a concrete conclusion, look elsewhere. I do not by any means think that Found Audio is a bad book. I really liked it, but describing it as Indiana Jones meets Inception is little off the mark, but in some ways, it is also spot on. Don’t go in expecting an exciting adventure novel. This reads more like a mini Murakami novel with its depth and surrealism. Found Audio is a breath of fresh air, but you should be in the mood to read something experimental. I gave Found Audio 4 out of 5 stars, and I will be picking up more from Two Dollar Radio when I am craving something unique.

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