Book Review · Nonfiction

From Here to Eternity

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Last year I reviewed Caitlin Doughty’s previous book, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, which was her memoir that discussed her experience in the death industry. From Here to Eternity is Doughty’s travel account of death rituals from around the world. She visits places in the U.S. where they have open air cremation, Japan where they combine technology and old practices, Indonesia where in some places they keep their dead at home for months to years, and Bolivia where an old skull can give you financial advice. These places (and more!) offer a different kind of send off for the body and the spirit of the deceased. Doughty interviews both those in the death industry and normal mourners to give an expansive look at death practices in different cultures.

Doughty gets a lot of flack from traditional funeral homes in the U.S. She has become a green burial boogeyman to them because she advocates for more eco-friendly and cheaper options for mourners instead of the pricey and unnecessary casket and embalming process that many funeral homes push hard. Some may call her a kind of “death hippie” because of these ideas, but I at least think that she makes a lot of good points. As I said in my review of her other book, I don’t think she comes off too preachy about her ideas because she is only advocating for more options, not saying we should all do things her way.

She also encourages Americans to take a look at how we avoid death in our culture. Many of the cultures she discusses in her book get up close and personal with death. They confront it by taking care of the deceased’s body, incorporating death into festivals and art, and making death a less somber and strained affair. I think the following quote sums up the book nicely:

“Many of the rituals in this book will be very different from your own, but I hope you will see the beauty in that difference. You may be someone who experiences real fear and anxiety around death, but you are here.”

Here you are. As I’ve mentioned before, I had actual panic attack when thinking in depth about death. Doughty’s wit, humor, and factual information has comforted my own death anxiety because I was finally able to confront my fear and mostly conquer it. From Here to Eternity does not have to be about death advocacy or avoidance; you can simply enjoy learning about the death rituals in other cultures, which is extremely interesting itself. But it would be a disservice to Doughty not to mention the underlying ideals she works so hard to bring to the forefront of American culture.

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