Book Review · Nonfiction

The Hidden Life of Trees

THLoTbyPW

A new post?! Yes! I am not dead, but I am still not really reading. As much as I love physical books, I cannot seem to find the time or energy to use my eyes to read anything except the infinitely depressing news in the U.S. right now. On the bright side, spring has sprung where I am, so I have been trying to go for walks/runs more often. In the spirit of spring and because I cannot seem to read a physical book, I have been listening to an audio book about trees on my walks. And it’s great! Now, hold on there, you might say. Trees? What is so interesting about trees? What hidden life could they possibly have? Well, my friend, let me tell you about a few tree-rific facts I have learned. Maybe I can get you as excited about trees as I am.

Author Peter Wohlleben is a forester with extensive experience with both commercial forestry and conservation. In this book Wohlleben details the life cycle of trees, their role in keeping forests (and the planet) healthy, how trees “care” for their young, and how trees communicate with each other. Yes, I said communicate. No, they do not speak as we do, of course, but they are actually able to communicate in a few different ways. Wohlleben describes how trees have a sense of smell, feeling, and taste. Again, it isn’t the same sort of senses that we have, but they are able to detect and react to scents, injuries, and, for example, pests’ saliva. It was also interesting to learn that the quiet forest you are walking around in is teeming with action below the surface. Trees are able to communicate via the “Wood Wide Web,” a network of connections between plant roots and fungi that can transfer warnings as well as nutrients to other connected members.

As I mentioned, I read this via an audio book. The narrator, Mike Grady, has a British accent that reminded me of the narration on something like a wildlife documentary: soothing, authoritative, and clear. The language of the book is not difficult. Most terms are defined, and easy to understand examples are given to explain more complex topics. So, do not be discouraged if you know nothing about trees!

I am completely biased, but I think the best way to enjoy this book is by being outside, taking a walk, or at least sitting by a sunny, tree-filled window. I loved being able to listen to the book while looking around at the trees outside. I consider myself an environmentally friendly person already, but I gained even more respect for trees, fungi, forests as a whole, and how they are all integral for a healthy and happy planet. I rated The Hidden Life of Trees four out of five stars.

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