Shades of Milk and Honey

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I recently discovered a book recommendation service called Tailored Book Recommendations (TBR) from one of my favorite YouTube book reviewers, Kayla from BooksandLala. She did a video in which she used the service, read the recommended books, and reviewed the experience. I thought it was a great idea, so I also used the service. I specified that I wanted recommendations that were a mix of historical fiction and fantasy because I love that mashup of genres. So, I was recommended three books by the service: Shades of Milk and Honey, The Night Tiger, and The Tiger’s Daughter. I will be reviewing all three on my blog so that you can get a sense of the recommendation service experience. I’m of course not sponsored by them. I just wanted to try something new!

This novel takes place in Regnecy era England in which magic exists and is considered a worthy skill for a woman to have. Jane Ellsworth has just about given up on finding a husband for herself because of her plain looks, but her younger sister, Melody, has a few possible suitors. Jane is a skilled glamourist, meaning that she can use magic to create sensory experiences to entertain at parties, cloak herself in darkness, or make a room look, smell, and feel like another place. Melody is very beautiful, but she lacks talent at glamour and is jealous toward her talented older sister. Jane gets caught up in her sister’s scheming and a friend’s secret, and along the way she just might find love of her own.

I liked this novel, but it didn’t blow me away. The overall tone of the story is light. No one is saving the world from an ancient evil. Instead, the plot is more concerned about who will end up marrying who and if so-and-so’s party will be a success or not. The stakes were low, but the reading experience was actually fun and relaxing. My main complaints are that I wanted to know more about the interesting magic system, I wished the writing and plot had more depth, and that the romance was less of a plot point.

The main characters were developed well enough, but I wouldn’t have minded spending more time with them and the secondary characters to learn more about them. Jane is our main character, and she is level-headed, talented at glamour, and cares a lot about her friends and family. Her sister, Melody, is a little more flighty and flirty, and she loves having the attention of her suitors. The men in the story could have been fleshed out more though. One man is a young, handsome playboy, another is a mature and polite gentleman, and another is a mysterious and prickly glamourist. I was happy with the romantic outcome, but I’m just not one for romance, especially when the romance is really the driving force of the novel.

I was very intrigued by the magic system, but the explanation for it was a little vague. It seems like it has something to do with being able to see and bend strands of light like strings of thread? There was a lot of talk about light and how the threads could be “tied off” to do certain things. Though I do not need a Brandon Sanderson-style magic system where all the rules are laid out, I would have liked to know more about how the glamour worked because many times Jane could see the inner workings of the magic, but the reader was not given much information about how she could do this or what it looked like to her. How the magic was used was also very cool. There were a few parties and gatherings in the book and the entertainment for the parties could be a short play put on with glamour or the party location could be spiced up by using glamour to make the room look and smell like a forest. There are several books after this first one, so maybe the magic and world are expanded more later on, but I don’t think I am interested enough to continue reading.

With the world on fire, it was nice to escape to a simpler time with a low stakes story. I gave Shades of Milk and Honey three out of five stars.

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